of picture stories, but the two most often used are the
Illustrated Text and the Picture-Text Combination.
With the Illustrated Text, emphasis is placed on the
text with photographs used to support the words. In
the Picture-Text Combination, the story is told
primarily through pictures and the words support the
pictures.
Planning is essential in the production of a picture
story. You should plan your photographic coverage
so the finished story shows the professional news
touch. When you want this quality in your picture
story, coverage techniques should include the
following: researching the subject and establishing a
good relationship; selecting equipment (camera,
lens(s), lighting, film) that is best suited for the job;
anticipating the improbable and having an alternate
plan available; keeping your pictures from looking
posed; moving in on the subject and making your
pictures show the desired action; using a shooting
script; having self-confidence; ensuring complete
coverage by shooting both left- and right-facing
photographs, long shots, medium shots, and close-ups,
as well as both vertical and horizontal views. Picture
stories do not appear in print by accident. They are
the result of careful planning, thorough research, and
execution. The development of a picture story is
carried out in six well-defined steps as follows:
1. DEVELOPING THE IDEA. All picture
stories begin with an idea. Whenever you cannot find
picture-story material, you are admitting that you are
not very alert, observant, or curious. Wherever you
go, there are more story ideas than you could possibly
find the time to do. You can get ideas for picture
stories by subjecting yourself to stimulating
experiences, talking to other people, and observing
situations- both your own and those related to you by
others.
2. RESEARCHING THE SUBJECT. After
developing an idea for a picture story, you are ready
to research the subject. Research is one of the most
important parts of doing a picture story. Before you
start shooting, you need to learn as much as possible
about the place, situation, object, and people involved.
The more complicated the story, the more research
you need to perform. No matter what form the
research takes, remember one very important
thing-YOU CANNOT PERFORM ALL YOUR
RESEARCH SITTING AT A DESK. You must leave
the shop, talk to people, see the subject. While no
two people perform research in exactly the same
manner, the following guidelines are recommended:
a. Contact the person in charge of whatever
or whomever you intend to do the story on, and
explain your story idea.
b. Obtain the name and phone number, work
schedule, and background information on each person
involved in your story.
c. Observe the operation without interfering
and make notes on picture possibilities.
d. Stay with the subject(s) until you are fully
satisfied that you can anticipate their next move or
work step; watch the subject(s) for facial expressions,
gestures, and observe them during coffee breaks, and
so on.
e. Anticipate a sudden departure from the
usual and be prepared to cope with it.
f. Conduct interviews with the subject(s),
their peers, subordinates, and seniors. Whenever
possible, shoot the photographs at one session and
conduct the interview at another.
3. PLANNING THE TREATMENT. The
"treatment" is an arrangement of facts you have
collected; this includes the type of pictures you
require to convey the theme or purpose you have in
mind adequately. Plan your pictorial coverage.
Decide what elements of the story should be presented
verbally, and what elements should be presented
visually.
Because each picture story is somewhat different,
you cannot follow the same pattern for each
assignment. There are, however, certain planning
criteria upon which all picture stories are based. The
planning criteria is as follows:
a . INTEREST. The readers must gain
something from the story or they are not going to read
it.
b. PICTURE IMPACT. It must appeal to
the eye, create curiosity, and hold the viewer's
attention.
c. SCOPE. The picture story of a ship is
possible but difficult; a department within the ship is
a little less difficult; a division within the department
is even less difficult; one person within the division is
comparatively simple. By narrowing the scope and
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Advanced Photography Course






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